Payroll Transformations from Payments to Hiring

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Episode Description: Has there ever been a time when payroll had to pivot as dramatically as it did at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic? Entire operations moved off-site, mostly from home. Hear from two highly regarded payroll professionals, the American Payroll Association’s President and the Executive Vice President for Payroll from Entertainment Partners, as they discuss what had to change right away, what innovations are driving further change in payroll operations, and how employer policies for paying and hiring workers have to be modified to meet fiscal, safety and diversity requirements.  

About Our Speakers

Lois Fried

Lois Fried, CPP, is President of the American Payroll Association, the nation’s leader in payroll education, publications and training with more than 20,000 members. 

Lois has spent 40 years in the human capital management industry, leading and training successful teams, implementing training materials and educational programs, most recently with ADP, before starting LKF Consulting. Prior to becoming APA’s president, Lois received APA’s Meritorious Service Award and Citation of Merit, California’s Payroll Professional of the Year Award and Banker of the Year Award. 

As APA’s president, she recently spoke in general sessions at the APA Congress XStream, where she was also a podcast participant and a workshop presenter; she is a contributing writer to the APA’s PayTech magazine. 

Lois was also a founding member of Bloomberg Tax Payroll Advisory Board.

Davida Lara

Davida Lara, the Executive Vice President of Payroll at Entertainment Partners, is recognized as a national thought leader who excels in taking action in payroll process implementation. Through her more than 20 years of experience, she has gained extensive expertise developing systems and process automation, as well as in training personnel. She also has been responsible for developing global mobility best practices and payroll shared services. 

Prior to joining EP, Davida was the Senior Vice President and Head of Global Payroll for The Blackstone Group, where she oversaw global payroll operations impacting over half a million employees. Prior to that, she was Head of Global HRIS and Payroll at Harman International Industries, directing system strategy and implementation for more than 23 countries. 

Throughout her career, Davida has headed numerous diversity and inclusion initiatives, and continues to be a voice for empowering women. She sits on the Board of Directors for The Rowan Center: A Sexual Assault Resource Agency. 

Michael Baer

Michael Baer is the host and executive producer of The Source podcast. Michael previously oversaw domestic and international payroll news and analysis at Bloomberg Tax, previously BNA. 

In a career spanning three decades, Michael transformed the role of managing editor, becoming an information services leader who managed every aspect of world-class global products and platforms, while continuously increasing revenue and achieving market-best customer satisfaction. He directed a team of editors and writers who were charged with translating complicated tax and labor laws into English so non-lawyers could easily understand and apply them, and was integral in organizing and placing that content on easy-to-access web platforms, resulting in the highest net promoter scores the company had seen for any of their offerings. 

Michael has been a frequent public speaker for conferences and webinars, and now is the host of The Source, sponsored by DailyPay. Michael joined the DailyPay team in 2019.

In this podcast you will learn …

  • A description of the significant and necessary adjustments/adaptations that were put in place for payroll operations, starting in mid-March with the COVID-19 shutdown
  • How transformative payments technology that is both already available and being developed can improve the employee experience
  • Employer hiring policies that are changing to address post-pandemic work environments and achieve more diverse workforces
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About this podcast:

Welcome to The Source, the definitive destination for timely and informative regulatory updates and issues in the on-demand pay industry. The Source is brought to you by DailyPay, the industry leading provider of the DailyPay benefit and pay experience.

This material is for general information only and the views expressed herein reflect only the views of the participants.

This program should be considered marketing material and should not be relied on as legal, tax, accounting, or regulatory advice.

And now let’s welcome our host Michael Baer.

Michael Baer:

Hello everyone, and welcome to The Source. The Source is sponsored by DailyPay and provides insights into active and upcoming legislation impacting on-demand pay, and with special guests, we help clarify issues surrounding early access to pay and the pay experience.

Michael Baer:

Today, after we dive into some new developments surrounding on-demand pay, including the latest Rehire America Index of employment statistics for certain sectors of the economy, I am thrilled to have two dynamic leaders from the payroll industry with me; the President of the American Payroll Association, Lois Fried, CPP, and the Executive Vice President of Payroll for Entertainment Partners, Davida Lara. These two will be discussing key changes in payroll operations brought on by the imperative to work remotely, the impact of the economic shutdown and how this has spurred the adoption of some innovative technologies and what that means for payroll in the future. Then we will pivot and discuss rehiring efforts specifically to fill payroll positions, given all the changes, and then more generally initiatives taken by employers to rehire differently than in the past.

Michael Baer:

But first on new developments, the Supreme Court recently held that the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau can be replaced at the pleasure of the president rather than as enacted by Congress. Why is this significant? Well, the head had been a presidential appointee, but by law it was somewhat more insulated from firing then the head of other agencies, and a lawsuit was filed that called the law that created the CFPB into question, the entire constitutionality of the CFPB was in question, not just the fact that the head of the agency could not be fired at will by the president. Well the Supreme Court ruled that yes, the president can fire the head of the CFPB, but left unsaid was the status of the CFPB.

Michael Baer:

So the CFPB continues on and it came about, of course, as a result of the economic collapse of 2008, which it could have been declared on unconstitutional, but that did not happen. Right now it does live on, albeit in a capacity that more truly aligns with Trump administration initiatives. Those initiatives include allowing payday lenders to not have to perform credit checks on potential clients before loaning money. This is under a portion of a rule that has recently been rescinded by the latest CFPB leadership. And this move coupled with administration efforts to allow predatory payday lenders to use the backing of national banks to avoid state mandated interest rate limits, this all means that payday loans are living another day or another year or so.

Let’s move on to something a little more positive; some statistics on rehiring. According to the Rehire America Index, which is a DailyPay effort to provide up to date statistics on hiring an hour’s work, these amounts are gleaned from DailyPay’s employer partners, during the 11 week period from May 11th to July 26, there has been double digit hiring growth in healthcare, and quick service restaurants have been hiring up 32% since May 11th, supermarkets, 28% and caregiver industries, 18%. Recently however, some sectors have plateaued in hiring and reductions in staff may be happening again because of the possible need to shut down some operations due to the continued spread of the coronavirus in some areas.

To track the hiring movement across eight different sectors.

That’s it for the news, now let me introduce our special guests. Davida Lara is the Executive Vice President of Payroll at Entertainment Partners and is recognized as a national thought leader who excels in taking action and payroll process implementation. Through her more than 20 years of experience, she has gained extensive expertise developing systems and process automation, as well as in training personnel. She also has been responsible for developing global mobility best practices and payroll shared services.

Prior to joining EP, Davida was the Senior Vice President and head of Global Payroll for the Blackstone Group where she oversaw global payroll operations impacting over half a million employees. Throughout her career, Davida has headed numerous diversity and inclusion initiatives and continues to be a voice for empowering women. She sits on the board of directors for the Rowan Center, a sexual assault resource agency. And recently Davida was very well received as the keynote speaker at this year’s American Payroll Association’s Congress Extreme talking about how her payroll career has played out to where she is now in the C-suite. Davida, welcome.

Davida Lara:

Thank you. Thank you so much for having me, Mike.

Michael Baer:

All right. Joining Davida is Lois Fried, CPP. Now CPP, for those who may not know, stands for certified payroll professional. Lois is the current president of the American Payroll Association, which is the nation’s leader in payroll education, publications, and training that has more than 20,000 members. Lois has spent 40 years in the human capital management industry, leading and training successful teams, implementing training materials and educational programs, most recently with APA, before starting LKF Consulting.

Prior to becoming APA’s president, Lois received numerous accolades from the association, including a Meritorious Service Award, a Citation of Merit, California’s Payroll Professional of the Year Award, and Banker of the Year award. As APA’s president, she recently spoke in general sessions at the APA Congress Extreme and has been a podcast participant and a workshop presenter. She’s a contributing writer to APA PayTech Magazine. Lois also was a founding member of Bloomberg Tax Payroll Advisory Board. Welcome Lois.

Lois Fried:

Glad to be here, Mike.

Michael Baer:

Let’s get started. These guests know so much. How much you ask? Well, the experience here kind of speaks volumes, doesn’t it? There probably is a lot they would rather not know or forget regarding payroll issues. Am I right? Because payroll is so dynamic and ever changing that many best practices from the past simply may not apply anymore. New ones have risen up. In that regard, many payroll operations have had to make dramatic changes in processes and procedures once this economic shutdown hit the country in mid March.

Michael Baer:

Let’s start with Davida. What were some of the key adjustments or adaptations or actions you saw that needed to be made?

Davida Lara:

Well, before we start talking about what needed to change, let’s talk about what needed to stay the same. When you think about payroll as a discipline and the need for it, that’s the thing, especially now

most of us have learned that during a crisis it’s more important that people get paid than it’s ever been. And that’s been proven because during this process we have been identified as an essential service or an essential business, and we’ve had to keep the doors open so that people can get paid. What does have to change and people have to adapt to is that we had to operationally figure out how to get people to work remotely a lot more quickly than we would’ve thought we needed to before.

Davida Lara:

And it’s interesting because payroll is one of those roles that people see as a task that’s very mundane and requires the keying and punching and the paper associated to get it done. And what we realized is that we had to be able to manage to a paperless process with very little planning. I mean, I don’t think any of us was prepared for COVID to come in, but we had to do it with minimal planning and then still gain the trust of in our particular situation of our clients, that we’re not going to drop any balls during that time.

Davida Lara:

And then when you’re taking an industry that was very comfortable with dealing with paper and making them digital, we had to highlight what’s probably one of the most important things to us is our security and the high level and military like security we’re putting around data, especially around compliance and privacy laws, particularly here in California, that’s on the rise, we had to adapt to that very quickly too.

Michael Baer:

Okay. Lois, what have you observed?

Lois Fried:

Well, I serve two roles. I am, as you mentioned, President of the American Payroll Association and also owning my own small business, gives me an opportunity to really communicate and chat with a number of employers here in my own city and also members across the country. So one of the things that I observed as I chatted and talk with these people were many of the companies had to make quick decisions, as Davida said, to right in the middle of the crisis, to be able to continue to operate and to get the payrolls processed because that’s the number one job of the payroll professional.

Lois Fried:

Of course as payroll as did the rest of the departments that payroll works with, we had to learn very quickly all of the acts that were taking place. We had the Cares Act and we had the Payroll Protection Program and we had the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and the Emergency Family Medical Leave Act. So even though those were HR probably driven areas to really pay a lot of attention to, payroll had to play a role and understanding where we fit into all of that. A lot was happening in a very short period of time.

Lois Fried:

Some of the members certainly shared that they were able to quickly adjust to being fully remote because they were already working in an existing infrastructure, such as a cloud based software and also working with their service providers, the capabilities of their service providers certainly added to them being able to pivot pretty quickly to working in a remote environment. And they continued to process certainly as they had been prior to COVID-19, but other organizations were not so prepared. And these were the smaller organizations and some of the mid-size companies that were not really prepared.

Lois Fried:

One of the things that my city did here, they created a chamber cares initiative round table of small business owners, which was so perfect to bring us together every Thursday morning, to be able to talk about the Payroll Protection Program and filling out applications, and what does that all look like in terms of what the employers needed to do, and looking at how are we going to get our people paid in the swiftest manner and work through that process. So having that council put together very quickly and to bring us together to meet certainly worked beautifully.

Lois Fried:

However, some of the members that I spoke to at the APA said, “You know, we had to really think fast about what we were going to do and how we’re going to do it.” And one of the things that one of the members shared is they actually had to pick up the server and the whole network system and bring it to her home for the continuation of payroll processing and financial information that needed to get out. So she said, “I had a lot of sleepless nights with that server sitting in my home.” It’s over now and is back in the company location, but that was the only way to keep things moving because it came up on them with no plan of how they were going to do that. But they worked it through and that worked out pretty well for them.

Lois Fried:

I think what we’re looking for here is certainly, as Davida said also, we have to be consistent and we have to be accurate. We feel like sometimes in payroll, we still need technology to help us with that. Our technology still has a little bit to be desired, although it certainly has gotten much better over the years. And payroll really, they want that seat at the table where they’re there hoping that they can have input now after COVID-19, because this is probably the biggest and most in-our-face instant that we had to respond to than any other crises. Payroll professionals have been responding to crises for years, but this one came upon us really in a big way here. So they’re hoping that they will have some input to the full process improvement programs in their organizations, and have a seat at the table to talk about that.

Michael Baer:

Okay, that’s great Lois and Davida. Several things that come to my mind here with that is that, well first the impetus to ensure people continue to get paid, and that of course was the impetus of the government to with the Payroll Protection Program and other initiatives to make sure the money keeps flowing to people, even whether they’re working or not. That was one thing.

Michael Baer:

And then the other thing kind of along the lines of what you were talking about, and I’ll lead into this next question, is the kind of impromptu or so they say some people had to do some improvisation in order to continue to have these operations go, with all that and despite all those hardships going through right now, and Lois why don’t you start with this one, what progress and innovation do you see coming out of this? What good things do you see regarding paying workers that leveraging this technology could be transformative to the employee experience?

Lois Fried:

Well, I think that the key thing that came right to mind was they shared immediately from a number of the members that I spoke with that they’ve developed a more collaborative atmosphere. And that was so refreshing to hear, because going to a virtual environment you would think that everything would be a bit helter-skelter and people not knowing which way to go and how to bring all of this together.

Lois Fried:

But out of this has come this wonderful, collaborative working relationship that they’re hoping lasts when they go back to being in person and working in the home office that this is going to continue, because it’s really been refreshing to them. And also to have more interaction with the employees who of course, for payroll, those are our customers. And having that opportunity to use technology around that to bring us together in virtual meetings and not only just about work but also keeping some of the fun things going that we would normally do in our offices, being very creative and innovative to bring programs virtually to the employees, to answer questions, to help them understand the process and how jobs are going to get done.

Lois Fried:

All of that technology has come to bear to help them through that process. I think that it will just continue to bring us closer together, give everybody more opportunity to think more innovative and taking that input from the employees from a C-suite level; we are listening, we hear you, and we’re going to make some changes for payroll. Hopefully that’s going to continue.

Michael Baer:

Okay. Davida, what are your impressions of what can come about that’s positive? What kind of innovations you think are going to be applied?

Davida Lara:

Oh, it’s so much. It’s so much Mike. I’m glad that Lois mentioned the importance of making the job easier for payroll professionals. But I also think about our clients more too, and what that means for them. Shout out to technology. Let’s talk about that for a second.

Davida Lara:

Sometimes it’s to be desired the relationship that we tend to have with technology, but like you mentioned and specifically in my role where I do have a seat at the table, and I am a part of the strategy that’s around what happens with payroll and for our industry in particular, the partnership within technology has been incredible right now. [inaudible 00:19:33] important for our clients to have a no-touch environment right now because of COVID and health issues and so on and so forth in an industry that was probably not as innovative behind the camera as they were in front of the camera, leading the way for us to do that. And providing tools for them, not just around timecard capture and onboarding and things that have been around in other industries for a long time, but by self-service as well, like access to what we call My EP, which is very well known as self-service so people can get access to their data, their payroll data.

Davida Lara:

So the embracing of the technology to me is extremely exciting considering that’s a huge initiative of mine anyway. So to see people embracing that technology now it’s phenomenal.

Michael Baer:

Yeah. And speaking of no-touch or kind of expediting pay, there has been an uptick of course in the use of tools like on-demand pay or kind of a daily pay operations. I know Davida you have your own services within your organization that does that, but we have seen an uptick in the use of those tools for people to help them be able to afford to get to the next paycheck when it comes.

Michael Baer:

Lois, you’ve seen an uptick in that, haven’t you?

Lois Fried:

Oh, absolutely. I think COVID-19 certainly opened the door to looking at more than a paper paycheck. Over the years we have broad direct deposit in, and that has been totally perfect for the payroll department and for organizations. However, that’s not enough. We have a different group of employees out there that are working, and we want to be able to also offer other options. And the pay card it’s talked about all the time, the electronic pay card, and having employees have other options and methods to get paid. So on-demand pay, the pay cards, making it easy, making it safe, and really keeping the cost down.

Lois Fried:

One of the things that I like probably the most out of this whole electronic pay options and methods that are available is having the employees in control of their own pay and being able to, if they need it, certainly they can, they can reach out and grab a piece of it when they need it to take care of certain situations within their own personal life, but also giving them the opportunity to look at how they can save, and being able to see those transactions. If you’re just paying with cash, you get paid and you pay everything cash and you can’t track and follow it, but with electronic payments, you’re able to actually see a report of how you spend your dollars and maybe changing your budget around to make everything work better for your family.

Lois Fried:

I think that there’s just many opportunities out there. Those will not go away. I think we’ll just continue to see ways that we can help employees have different options and also to make it where they are. They’re all on their phones, their smartphones, they’re all using their laptops and iPads and everything, so we make this available where they can just at a touch, as David said, to get to that information and be able to manage their own personal lives so much better. I’m looking at that innovation to just continue to get better and better.

Michael Baer:

Right. There’s your shout out to technology that Davida was talking about.

Michael Baer:

Okay. Did you want to say something to me?

Davida Lara:

Yeah, just actually one more note around that is an addition to technology, all of these are making us look at processes too. Even though we do payroll like we used to at the beginning of the time, the way we pay people is forcing us to have to look at the how behind that. So our turnaround time is quicker. You mentioned pay cards and direct deposit, and the way we’re paying people for us, you even think about what’s being dictated from the unions and the gills on when we should be paying, and how we pay is dictating that runway that we used to have to process. So how we pay, what we pay is changing at the same time. So it’s dynamic and it’s awesome.

Michael Baer:

Yep. Those are some key takeaways that are going to be applied in the future. They’re starting to be applied now. So great observations. Thank you.

Michael Baer:

Let’s move on to now some tricky issues in this environment or coming out of this environment, although I think we’re going to be still in this kind of work environment, mostly remote for a while, but in parts of the country and much of the world, some businesses are starting to operate at close to pre-pandemic levels and they’re hiring and rehiring staff thankfully. For payroll specifically, how has working remotely and the influx of new technologies changed what you are looking for in a payroll professional?

Michael Baer:

Let’s start with Davida.

Davida Lara:

Well for me honestly, it hasn’t changed much on what I look for, because I think with payroll you have certain things that you need technically, and that’s around the attention to detail and all the stuff that I can say, but for me, you have to have a passion for it. You need to want to understand that when you’re dealing with payroll, it has less to do with the numbers or the compliance. Well I shouldn’t say that, but it’s everything to do with the compliance, but more so about the people you touch. And you think about is one of the best jobs in the world, because it’s one of the few things where you can truly see the impact that you have on other people in their lives, which is why I’m so passionate about it, and why I say it’s so sexy. You’ve heard me say it before, payroll is sexy. You’ve got to believe that payroll is sexy to do payroll.

Davida Lara:

I can teach you everything that we can do. I can teach you the rules around it. We’ve got APA that helped me in my career that can teach you the rules around it. But if you don’t want to do it, you’re not going to do it and you’re not going to do it well. Right now, with everything going on with COVID, how we pay people and what we pay people, it’s changing even more. So if you don’t have a passion about understanding what the impact of those payments means to an individual, then you won’t be successful in this space.

Davida Lara:

So when I’m reaching out and I’m asking people about a job in payroll, I’m always asking, why? Why do you want to do it? And the first thing they may say is because I want to get paid and pay my bills. Well, that’s a good answer because you got to be one of your favorite customers when we do what we do. But it really is. When I describe to you what it is that payroll is and what it means to people, to an organization, to the human capital, you’ve got to be, yeah, I’m ready. I’m ready for it. And then I take it from there.

Michael Baer:

Well that’s really interesting Davida. It reminds me of an old coach, a very successful coach. One of the keys to his success of course was how he motivated his players. He was asked, “How do you motivate your players?” And he said, “Get motivated players.” So Davida, it seems like that’s the principle that you’re applying here in your search for players on your payroll team.

Michael Baer:

Let’s move on to Lois. Lois Fried, could you let us know what your take is on how to succeed in this new environment for the payroll professional? What does one need in terms of skills and other things to make it in this new environment?

Lois Fried:

Well I certainly think that we’re going to bring along those great communication skills. You must have those. We must just continue to enhance our communication skills. We have to also keep those soft skills coming with us at all times, but also looking for those employees or those potential candidates, I should say, that are bringing digital skills, that they’re not afraid of technology, and they’re open to continuing to learn and grow when it comes to technology. I think that that is very, very important.

Lois Fried:

A lot of people, when they heard about, oh, artificial intelligence and they heard robotics and all of these things, they go, “Oh my goodness, in five or six years we will have lost our jobs because it’ll all be done by robots.” Well not so. I think that we’ve kind of had to step back from that and say, “Well, maybe those robotics are going to help us do those mundane types of jobs and tasks that we have to do.” But someone still has to crunch the numbers and bring the numbers together and be able to make sure that checks are accurate and correct, and that’s going to take some human intervention, so I don’t think that’s ever going away, but you still certainly need to have those skills to be able to utilize some of the new technology that will be afforded to the payroll professional.

Lois Fried:

Also around just confidentiality and security. As you mentioned earlier, Mike, we are going to probably be in the working from home environment for some time to come. In talking with members and also with employers here in my town, some have said, Oh, we’ll be out till the end of December.” Others are saying, “We’ll probably be out until July of 2021.” And there are other companies that said, “We may never go back to an office environment for work.” It’s all over the map there, and we don’t know where that’s really going to play out, but we’re all just trying to be prepared and ready for it.

Lois Fried:

I think that a lot of these skills are going to mean that confidentiality and security are also areas that we’re going to be looking for to bring in candidates that may have some of that technology behind them so that we can really be sure that we’re watching our employees pay and keeping their personal information personal and confidential.

Michael Baer:

That’s a great point, Lois, of data security, data privacy. As Davida noted at the top of the program is super important as we move into these remote environment, that it’s very critical on the payroll side, that this gets locked down.

Michael Baer:

So switching a little bit here. More broadly on the rehire topic, please let me know your observations of companies changing in general, how they are hiring and rehiring workers. I know we talked specifically about payroll. Now I’m talking broader organizationally. The impact of the pandemic itself requires some rethinking and recruitment now, for sure. After the murder of George Floyd, there has been a push for more systemic change, more recognition and desire by employers to hire differently or recruit a more diverse workforce. Am I right? What are your thoughts on this?

Michael Baer:

Lois, could you take this first this time?

Lois Fried:

Well just thinking about that, Mike, I would say that diversity should not be trending on the internet for organizations to get excited about, what they should be doing and looking at their responsibility. However, I’m happy that they have, but certainly I think diversity needs to be a goal, a strategic goal that is set by organizations and they should hold themselves accountable for how they are administering, auditing, following their diversity program.

Lois Fried:

And it’s not just a little spot on their website that says we offer a diversity program. What else are you doing to ensure that you’re living up to those goals and to those strategic programs that you set up? Be accountable for yourself. I think that sometimes when you’re dealing in the middle of a crisis and all of this kind of culminated together, we had the crises, we had the protest, we had the murder of George Floyd, all of those things coming together to think about and work with was a lot, but I think organizations should take this opportunity to look back and reflect on the last four months and what did we do right, and what might we need to change to really be accountable for our organization and make sure that every employee … and we have a diverse community here and we’re making it safe and warm and welcome for everyone.

Lois Fried:

I think that a lot of thought process needs to go into this and a lot of accountability and responsibility needs to be attached to it.

Michael Baer:

Okay. Thank you for that observation, Lois. Davida, what can you share about this?

Davida Lara:

Well I appreciate what you said Lois, in that it needs to be at the core, that it is not something that is trending, but it’s something that has to be embedded within an organization. And in order for it to be embedded in an organization and to be a part of the core and the values, I think it has to be a part of that value in the leadership. I have been a leader that has been committed to diversity always. There has not been much that’s been different than what I bought to the table at EP or any other firm that I’ve been at [inaudible 00:33:56] and that still sits in my core. So I’m going to ensure that who I work with has that incorporated in their core.

Davida Lara:

Much of what I’ve been finding, where we’re having success is that while it’s not to say, it’s not a focus because people are eating and sleeping and breathing it and it’s part of the culture, is just that we are able and can be able to create more diverse environments just by giving people the opportunity to have access to the roles that you’re hiring for. I think a lot of times what you don’t see is that organizations don’t branch out and give people those opportunities, because if they did organically that level of diversity and inclusion will ultimately happen is what I’m saying.

Davida Lara:

Also creating training to give people those skills, to give them the opportunity to apply for those roles that may come up. Particularly in the entertainment industry, we think about the production office. There’s so many people that don’t even know that a production office exists. We look at movies and TV and stuff, and don’t realize that there’s a team of people behind the camera that do payroll and accounting and all those jobs that support the industry. And it’s not very well known that they even exist.

Davida Lara:

So what I think I’m seeing come out of this to talk about some of the positives that’s coming out of what has happened recently is that you’re starting to find out about those opportunities and companies are starting to expose, did you know that you could, and they’re going to get more applicants that are diverse and then in turn, the organizations will be more diverse. So [inaudible 00:35:35] again, it’s in [inaudible 00:35:36] who you as an individual and for me, I’ll do nothing different. I’ll just keep doing exactly that, and then we should see some change there.

Michael Baer:

Wow, that’s powerful. Thank you both for the comments on that. As we move into this next kind of phase of rehiring and hiring, I know it is top of mind for a lot of organizations to make some changes so that they can be more mindful and considering of a more diverse workforce. It’s important. As we say, I mean, diversity is good for business. That’s just plain and simple.

Michael Baer:

I want to thank you, Davida Lara and Lois Fried so much for your time to come here and give us some understanding of how payroll operations and employees overall need to change and pivot to address the needs of this changing work environment. I want to thank you listeners for joining us today at The Source where DailyPay provides information and analysis of developments related to pay experiences.

Michael Baer:

Stay healthy and safe and keep an eye on your emails as we will have another compelling issue along with updates very soon. Thank you again.

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