2020 HR Technology Breakthroughs & Top Emerging 2021 HR Trends

Webinar Series

2020 HR Technology Breakthroughs & Top Emerging 2021 HR Trends

Webinar Series

2020 HR Technology Breakthroughs & Top Emerging 2021 HR Trends

In this webinar you will learn about…

  • 6 HR trends we saw emerge in 2020 (that we actually loved and learned from)
  • How HR professionals are planning for 2021 (now that we can do anything!)
  • The strategic secret role that Pay plays in your updated HR technology stack (yep, Pay!)

The year 2020 will be memorable for everyone, but especially for Human Resources professionals. This year challenged HR professionals to step up to the plate as heroes to the employees and to the organization. It was a time to bring people together (while apart), challenge the norms and use technology to fill the gaps. 

From reinventing the workplace experience to prioritizing health and safety to taking a closer look at diversity and inclusion, we’ll discuss all the achievements and breakthroughs for HR professionals across various industries. We’ll also look at what those breakthroughs signal for 2021 and how to continue moving forward and innovating.

In a world filled with negative news, this is the positive webinar you’ve been looking for!

Attend this webinar to ensure you are ready to take on anything in 2021, and that you are leveraging the most powerful tools we learned about in 2020 to keep your employees happy and your company growth bulletproof.

View On-Demand

Guest Speakers

Jeanniey Walden

Chief Innovation and Marketing Officer

DailyPay

Justin Hill

Vice President of Human Resources

Parking Management Company

Irene Hendricks

Chief People Officer

DailyPay

Barbie Winterbottom

CEO

the Business of HR

Webinar Transcript

Cynthia:

Well hello everyone and welcome to our webinar. We’re so thrilled to have everyone join us this afternoon for this fantastic webinar on 2020 HR Technology and Top Emerging 2021 HR Trends. This afternoon I am thrilled to introduce you to our outstanding presenters. Jeanniey Walden is an award winning entrepreneurial Chief Marketing Officer who uses innovation to transform the way companies work to accelerate growth and brand impact. Currently, she’s the Chief Marketing Officer of DailyPay, and transforming the employee Pay Day. Walden believes success can only be achieved when you start with a foundation of an authentic, inspirational and relatable customer experience, and marry that foundation to the latest advances in technology.

Cynthia:

Next we have Justin Hill, VP of Human Resources for Parking Management Company. Justin is responsible for leading the Human Resources Department and serves on the PMC executive leadership team. Justin and his HR team lead every function of Human Resources specializing in developing and executing recruiting systems that leverage technology and talent acquisition competitive advantages. Justin’s expertise is leading company wide game changing employee and labor relations initiatives that represent and reflect the company’s core values and company business fundamentals.

Cynthia:

Irene Hendricks is Chief People Officer at DailyPay. She’s an award winning HR executive who’s held critical leadership roles with blue chip fortune 500 companies and has been named Chief People Officer at DailyPay, the gold standard in on-demand pay echo system. As the company’s Chief People Officer, Miss Hendricks will be responsible for devising and executing all people related strategies for DailyPay, further positioning the fast rising, Fintech brand as an employer of choice. Before joining DailyPay, Irene held Human Resources leadership roles with world class organizations including American Express, General Electric, Citi, MasterCard, and Guardian Live.

Cynthia:

We also have Barbie Winterbottom joining us this afternoon who’s CEO of the Business of HR. Barbie Winterbottom is a strategic and insightful leader known for growing strong talent and fostering people first cultures. She thinks big and delivers powerful solutions to complex and often difficult business, people and culture challenges. She spent more than two decades in the world of human resources at industry giants, including Capital One, the Home Shopping Network, Amazon and Sykes Enterprises. She also earned her master’s degree in HR management and services in January 2018. So, it’s my pleasure now to turn it back over to Jeanniey Walden.

Jeanniey Walden (JW):

Thanks so much, Cynthia, and thank you all so much to my amazing panel. If those of you attending today have not had the opportunity to interact with any one of these three HR geniuses, then you are in for an absolute treat today. These three are like my go to guides on how to make sure that everything in HR is not just amazing, but over the top incredible.

JW:

Today, our topic is really focused on what did we learn out of 2020? What are we planning for 2021, and what is it that you need to know? We got together as a group, and I challenged this crew and said, “Hey, what are the six trends that we saw emerge in 2020? Things that we actually learned from, not just crazy trends like everybody worked from home, obviously, that happened. What did we hate? What did we love? What’s transformed your business?

JW:

I guarantee you, you’re going to hear about one of these trends and learn something that you didn’t know by the end of this call today, and you’re not only going to learn it, you’re going to apply it to your business. I promise you that. I’ve got some of my favorites in here that I repeat all the time and give this crew credit for.

JW:

The second thing we’re going to talk about is thank goodness, it’s November it is almost 2021, but how are we as HR professionals planning for 2021, now that we have proven that it doesn’t matter what you throw in our face, HR leaders can survive and thrive and build businesses that are sustainable and really focused on the future, while simultaneously taking care of employees personal and financial security, which is amazing.

JW:

Then the third thing that we’re going to talk about, which probably is my favorite is the secret strategic role that pay? Pay pays in your updated HR tech stack, and how that HRIS team that you have traditionally brought doughnuts to when you needed to get something done, who has turned into your best friend over the years can really leverage something as simple as pay to make it more effective.

JW:

With that said, let’s get moving. Let’s talk about the six trends that emerged in 2020. I’m going to introduce one of them and then open it up to the panel to discuss it. So, technology, work flexibility. Work flexibility driven by technology changes have really hit the top of the trend list, but it’s only number six. So, I feel like I’m going to count down on MTV’s greatest hits or something. But from a work flexibility standpoint, I asked this panel, what technologies were instrumental in enabling your teams to encourage work, remote, still effective, and with most flexibility?

JW:

Irene, we’ve done some crazy stuff at DailyPay, so I’ll start with you.

Irene Hendricks:

Sure, absolutely. I think like many organizations, DailyPay pivoted pretty much on a dime, in both our Minneapolis and New York locations to working in very, very different ways. We tended to be very intimate workplace. People were very present, people were constantly engaging in hallways, and physically and I would give a lot of credit to both our leadership team, our people team and our culture manager for just thinking about how to replicate those experiences using technology, and we’ve tried it all.

Irene Hendricks (IH):

Is it GoToMeeting, is it Slack, is it RingCentral, is it WebAccess, is it Google Meetings? We’ve really tried to put an array of technologies in front of people to find ways to collaborate, both on video and on audio, and just really making sure that we’re being intentional about creating connect points. Something that we’ve used, that I personally have loved as a newer colleague at DailyPay is the donut system, and that’s just an easy little Slack add-in, that randomly matches up to colleagues every week, who get together for half an hour and have virtual coffee.

IH:

It’s completely a random algorithm. So, it’s very agnostic. It pairs people across departments, across levels, longer tenured folks and shorter tenured folks, and really create some informal connections that we wouldn’t have had otherwise. Those are just a few that we’ve gotten great feedback on. As well, I give a lot of credit to our partner success and enablement team for doing virtual onboarding for our employees. Over the course of about a week, we do virtual onboarding, we have modules led by each of our departments, and I’m proud to say that as we’ve been growing and hiring, we’ve gotten a lot of good feedback via our employee culture surveys, that people are feeling connected, they have the information they need, and they’re able to hit the ground running, even if they’ve never physically been in our offices.

JW:

Yeah, I love that. Realistically, I think everything about working from home changed from the recruiting, hiring, onboarding process, to training, to interaction at the office. It really, I think there were some unprecedented things and some unexpected things. Justin, what was the most surprising thing you saw when everybody at Parking Management went remote?

Justin Hill (JH):

Well, I think there’s several trends that my fellow colleagues experienced that PMC also experienced as well. One of the biggest pieces that I think Irene hit on is the onboarding piece, and how that’s really changed the landscape of onboarding, has really changed really in our favor. We have a lot more connectivity at the corporate level to our new hires. We facilitate a monthly, world class orientations, we call them and they’re virtually held here at the corporate office, or we’ll travel around to a different site and have guest speakers that range from the executive committee to a client, to an up and rising star in our business.

JH:

We facilitate these onboarding sessions. They’re typically about an hour long via Zoom, and it’s really made a big impact. Kudos to my HR manager, Elizabeth Hagler, who’s really grasped the concept, and really, we’ve got the entire company behind this great initiative. Then too, we’ve leveraged our technology so our HRIS provider, Paycom, we utilize Paycom, love what they do and their partnership with DailyPay, how they’ve been able to integrate DailyPay into their portal. But we utilize their self-onboarding feature.

JH:

Everything’s become user friendly for the associates. Our onboarding process essentially went from having 25 tasks to do when you got hired as an hourly employee, now to seven, and we made it a lot more efficient for our hourly employees. Then for our managers, we’ve created a virtual onboarding [inaudible 00:10:30] manager playbook for our team, and they can access that virtually and one is also sent to their home upon hire. We’ve been able to think outside the box and get items delivered to managers on their first day, so they don’t have to go into the office and pick up a laptop or pick up their uniform, whatever it may be.

JH:

We’ve made quite a few efficiencies. Then, we utilize Zoom and GoToMeeting, and all these various platforms regularly now that we didn’t necessarily connect with some of those individuals we connected with in the past. Some of those folks that I never connected with in accounting, now I do. Some of those folks that our HR team never connected with, out in the field, now we do because of the technology efficiencies that we’ve seen in 2020.

JW:

Awesome, that’s fantastic. I think, when we were talking, Justin, you had mentioned that your office space has actually changed permanently now that everyone’s working from home and starting to get back to work. I think you mentioned that, in your world, the office has become a place of relaxation now versus the hardcore productivity because the productivity can happen anywhere, and I think that’s pretty fantastic and amazing. Because when we did our surveys, we asked employees that both work for DailyPay, but also employees of clients of ours, would they want to work remotely? Does it allow or make a company more attractive? Across the board, no matter how we ask the question, over 60% of people said, I love working remotely, I would still do it more even if I could return to the office, maybe split my time.

JW:

When I look for my next job, being able to potentially work remotely on certain days is going to be something that I look for. I think it’s really changed the landscape permanently. To round this question out, Barbie, I would just ask you, do you think that we’re ever going to go back to work permanently 100% in the office, or do you think that work flexibility is going to stay a trend consistently as we move into the future?

Barbie Winterbottom (BW):

Hello, everyone, by the way. Sorry, you can’t see me, technical difficulties here. But I don’t believe we will ever go back to what it was. I think, for many, many years employees who were seeking that flexibility, were begging for organizations to hear them in a meaningful way, and this pandemic, from a silver lining perspective has forced organizations to rethink what flexibility and accommodations really mean. I think the beauty of it is that we’ve realized that it’s not the end of the world, right?

BW:

My experience, prior to launching out as an entrepreneur with my own organization, I was at CHRO, and I had those conversations with the executive team. What I found often was that it was not necessarily a lack of confidence in the employee’s ability to work remotely. It was that the executive himself or herself just didn’t get it, they didn’t understand that it could be done, and they didn’t necessarily understand how to lead with trust, because they were either of a generation where we managed activity versus results.

BW:

This has pushed people into an uncomfortable space, but then on the other side of it, we have found a comfort that this is okay, and the world isn’t coming to a screeching halt because your employees are now working remotely. At the same time, I think those people who thought they wanted to work remotely full time, some of them may have recognized that it’s got its challenges, just like working in office has its challenges.

BW:

I think at a point in time when we feel like it’s safe and people are comfortable, we’ll have a hybrid model in office and at home working. I think every organization will come up with whatever makes sense for them and serving their customers and their employees. I even think the physical workspace setups will change. Because we don’t need dedicated offices for folks who may come in once a week, right?

BW:

I think that there’s a whole lot more change that will come as a result of this. But to answer your question, no, I don’t believe it will ever go back to the 100% in office setup that it was prior to say, March.

JW:

Yeah, I tend to agree with you. I think, everything has changed and in ways that both as employers and employees, we really didn’t expect it or ever consider what’s happening. Let’s get to number five, if work flexibility was one of the six trends, the fifth trend on our list was access to financial and wellness information.

JW:

I can tell you firsthand from working with all of the companies we work with at DailyPay, and watching their employees go through these uncertain times, there was a really big impact. It wasn’t just only employees of DailyPay companies, or DailyPay clients as much as it was their families that we saw impacted during COVID. Places where I still might have my job at my company, but my spouse, roommate or significant other may have either had to take a pay cut, been furloughed, or potentially even lost their job permanently, which put us all in a very strange situation and led many of us in the workforce to turn to our employers.

JW:

I think in a recent study that we did with Harris Poll, we found that 47% of employees were turning to their employers for financial and wellness advice and information on how to help the household through this scenario. That, I think challenged us all from an HR perspective on how we can best prepare our employees. So Justin, this time, I’ll start with you, what steps did you take and did your organization take to make sure that access to financial and wellness information was readily available, and potentially, some programs were even made available during the pandemic and the quarantine era to make sure that your employees and their families were safe?

JH:

There is no doubt, the hospitality industry, when you take all the industries and you view them and the effects that the pandemic has had, the hospitality industry has been devastated. We had to lay off quite a few of our friends here at PMC. Luckily, we’re on a great path to hiring everybody back and we’ve got a good strategy on the rebound. We are seeing the hospitality industry rebound. It’s really changed though for our business, and we have really adapted to the hospitality business and catered to those specific individuals that we hire to say, hey, while our hotels may not be full during the week, on the weekends, those folks that were traveling in years past with their business and so forth, are not traveling during the week. We’re seeing a big influx of the weekend traveler.

JH:

Folks now want to get out of their house because they work inside their homes for the majority of the week. You’re seeing a big influx on the weekend traveling. That said, we are a tip based company, a lot of our hourly staff out there make gratuities and tips from our customers and our guests. So, it’s really changing the mindset to say, hey, we’re a great employer on the weekends, and we can really, on that Thursday through Sunday schedule, we can cater to your needs. During the week, we can as well.

JH:

Adapting to our employees, I think adapting to the industry. Then what I’m really excited about, one of the things we’re doing is we’re partnering with a regional bank here locally, and we are offering financial information and financial wellness to our employees, in along with DailyPay too. Not only with access to folks pay every day, we obviously offer that with DailyPay, but also more of a financial strategy for them as well.

JH:

Very excited, about to roll that out to the team right now. It’s changed, and we’ve adapted with the industry changes, but I’ll tell you that it’s a moving target across the board, particularly in the hospitality industry, that it is a continuous moving target right now.

JW:

Yeah, for sure. Certainly, the amount of financial stress and now the remote working stress I think has put all of our employees in a precarious situation. Irene, talk about some of the stuff that you’ve been doing at DailyPay to keep employees both financially well but also manage their stress levels as they get through all of these challenges that they’re experiencing?

IH:

Yeah, no, it’s a great point, Jeanniey. One resource that I think many of us have, and that we were able to tap into was our 401(k) partner. We happen to work with Transamerica, I’m sure most of you work with a reputable organization that does fund management. They were wonderful coming in doing a number of education sessions for our employees to help them better understand concepts like asset allocation, time value of money, compound interest, and just really why early in your career, even saving a little bit can be so incredibly impactful. So, we were very grateful for their partnership.

IH:

In addition, we tapped an internal resource, one of our directors in the finance organization who did an internal seminar in partnership with one of our employee resource groups, our Daily Women ERG, just to talk about budgeting, investing and managing your finances from a very practical day-to-day perspective, particularly with regard to some of our early career professionals, they found that incredibly helpful.

IH:

Then we thought about the whole person and the whole employee. When we thought about wellness, we tried to really take the approach of, okay, we’re all working in this new normal, looking each other in this way, what can we do? Wow, we can do fitness. So, we actually have a trainer who comes in and does fitness sessions with our employees. We call it Daily Burn, everything is a Daily something. That’s a Daily Burn. We do meditation sessions to help people just disconnect and de stress. Again, you can do that over Zoom, not particularly difficult to do.

IH:

We’ve done a lot of reminders to colleagues. Also, again, these are resources, I think many of us have. Employee assistance program, mental health care benefits that are within our healthcare offerings and telemedicine to really encourage people not to hesitate and to access care when they needed it. We found that those reminders on our intranet through our Slack channels, et cetera have been really, really valuable.

IH:

Then I think the last point is, this notion of meeting overload and Zoom fatigue, we recently piloted something called Fall Fridays, and we’re asking everybody to disconnect on periodic Friday afternoons, just take between, call it like 1:00 and 5:00 and step away from meetings, take a little time to get away from the screen, because we do see Zoom fatigue is a real thing. Either engage in some heads down work, that just helps you feel like you cleared the deck before the weekend, or to actually get outside and disconnect. We’ve been having a wonderful run of fall weather here in the northeast. People have really been taking advantage of getting outside. I think it’s we’ve seen a real boost in just how people are feeling as a result of that.

JW:

Yeah, that’s great. That’s great. In the interest of time, I’m going to move on to number four, but it aligns perfectly with what you said, Irene? It’s not just financial and wellness that’s evolved, but also the entire workplace experience became a top priority. Barbie, I know from conversations with you early on that the pandemic did drive a lot of layoffs, a lot of furloughs. I know you had expressed with some people that you were working with that there were some strains on what was previously considered a family workplace and had mentioned that people felt that when somebody else was let go, they felt guilty. Why wasn’t it me? They have different needs. What did you see coming to life as a trend from a workplace experience standpoint, in the early days of pandemic, and how do you see that still playing out, now?

BW:

Yeah, there’s definitely a connection between the stages of grief and also survivor’s grief. Before I was independent, I shared with our employees a lot of information around the emotions that are tied to being the person who remains employed when you look over and your co-worker’s no longer there. They’ve been furloughed or their position has been eliminated, or what have you.

BW:

It’s okay to feel whatever it is you’re feeling, and allowing people a safe space to express those emotions, to share with their leader, their friend, someone else, whatever it is that they’re feeling, and on top of that, the fear of, am I next, and what is that going to mean to me and my family? Really just connecting with people on a human level in ways that we really hadn’t done necessarily, categorically before, and encouraging all of our members of leadership to reach out to folks on an individual basis and just talk to them about how they’re feeling.

BW:

Not how they’re doing with their project, not how work is going, but how are they doing, and what’s happening with their families and allowing them the opportunity to express themselves. That was a big part of, I think, helping people through the early stages of what was happening, because it all happened so very quickly. I think we were all in different stages of shock, and then stages of grief, which is very real. We don’t think about the stages of grief when it’s associated with job loss, but it is very real, especially for organizations that have a highly tenured population.

BW:

Some of these folks have worked together for 20, 30 years, they truly do feel like family. Now, all of a sudden, that person’s either not there because everyone’s working remotely, so they don’t get to see their best friend anymore, or they’re not there, because they’re not a member of the organization.

BW:

So, creating ways to remain connected was also very important. And encouraging folks to reach out. It’s okay to reach out to your friend who lost their job and say, “This really sucks. I’m so sorry this happened, and we’re all here rooting for you, and how can I support you? If you just want to talk, talk.” Because I think we feel as though we don’t know what to say, we don’t want to make someone feel bad, who just lost their job, but what we have to recognize is that they are going to feel bad anyway. They’ll feel a little bit less bad if you reach out to them and say, “I’m thinking of you. I still care about you as a person, and how can I support you?” Versus going radio silent and then feeling like, wow, the basis of that relationship was just because we were coworkers, and it wasn’t because they truly cared about me. You want to make sure you clarify that for folks and let them know you’re thinking about them.

JW:

Yeah, that’s such a great point, and I think communication creates such an important impact on the entire workplace experience. Irene, you’d mentioned it with a personal trainer, with meditation, with the doughnut sessions, it’s so many different ways that I think DailyPay proactively focuses on communication. In 30 seconds or less, did we miss any from a communication standpoint that you had said before? Only because we’re running out of time for the rest of these.

IH:

No, I’ll do 30 seconds or less, but something that I just found amazing, and again, in the spirit of giving people things that we might not have thought of ourselves, ask your team, what are their skills, interests and talents? Somebody on my team, unbeknownst to me, is a trivia queen. She’s been running trivia bowls, free, peer-to-peer, it’s been super fun, really well engaged. We’ve got a lot of people who have a lot of passion for diversity, equity and inclusion work. We’ve had all kinds of employee suggestions and employee facilitated sessions, just talking about books and movies on that topic.

IH:

Certainly, I think we have a lot of people who really care about social justice. Sometimes it’s not about you coming up with the idea, it’s about saying, where would you like to go with this? What would be helpful to you? I’ve just been just amazed and thrilled by what people have raised their hand and just said, “I want to do this for my colleagues.”

JW:

Yeah, I think that’s great. I know one of the most loved initiatives is every Friday, when Jason Lee the CEO, stands up for the entire company, and just as a great Zoom recap for the week. Justin, you’ve seen that too, with your leadership team and pulling people together with Microsoft Teams at your company. So, talk about how communication’s changed? Because in your world when you’re typically used to having people there on site having to work remotely, how was over communication so critical to keeping your teams engaged and enthused throughout 2020?

JH:

Well, I’ll do it quickly here, but I have four things that we’ve really done to differentiate PMC from our competitors. The first one being we’ve set up a bimonthly company call that we do, and it features our president, our COO, maybe the vice presidents and the operations team, but they report out essentially, it’s a rally cry out to the company of hey, here’s what our most important initiatives are this quarter, this is what we’re focused on, here’s where we’re at in relation to our goals. Yes, COVID has done this to us, but we’ve also made two acquisitions. We’ve also got 45 promotions last month, we’ve also done XYZ. So, it’s really a time to celebrate our people.

JH:

We don’t have a product, our product is our people. We’re a staffing company, and our people are really the product we sell. On this call, we celebrate the people of PMC. Bi-monthly president’s call, company call, a rally cry, a big pep rally. Then the second thing is executive level check ins. All of our new managers that join our team get a call from either the COO, the president, the general counsel, myself, the HR team, vice presidents, we distribute those contacts out, and we contact these new managers, welcome them to the team. We know they’re out on the front lines, they’re risking their lives with the public, they’re risking contracting COVID-19. So, we want to just give them a bit of appreciation and just check in with them to see how their onboarding is going, what we can do for them.

JH:

There’s a level of connectedness that really creates again, the people become the priority. Talk about workplace becoming, or priorities in the workplace, these two company call and the executive level check ins. The third thing being manager spotlights. Every month, my HR team, we take a manager, we spotlight them and say, “Hey, here’s what they’ve done for the organization. Here’s what they like to do outside of the organization, here are some of their hobbies. Meet so and so manager. Help us join them in welcoming to the team or help congratulate this manager on X, Y and Z initiative that they’ve accomplished.”

JH:

Our fourth thing is we’ve really amped up our surveys. Our new hire surveys, our manager surveys, any data collection point we can get from our employees is very valuable right now, because the face-to-face contact just may not be there. Surveys, manager spotlight, executive level check ins, and just a company wide call as our rally cry.

JW:

I love it. I think that’s awesome. It’s so great, because everything has come full circle in understanding how to build a deeper connection with your employees, and how to get them excited. I feel like all three of you are doing such amazing things for employees and for the organization, including the recognition of not just new ways to work and new ways to communicate, but new ways to have choice and control over money that’s made.

JW:

I know that all three of you have experience with DailyPay, so kudos to rethinking how employees are paid. But I know what I’ve seen from a DailyPay perspective is that there was a huge shift during COVID, and I mentioned it earlier, people prior to COVID were accessing DailyPay and taking their money out early for an independent, unplanned expense. But during COVID, typically people using DailyPay were employed, they might even have a savings account. But they might have some savings, they just couldn’t manage the entire household, the spouse, the roommate, the significant other, lost their job, got furloughed, took a pay cut, maybe it was in the early days when it was taking three months for people to get their unemployment check, even though they were going to get the full check and stipend hadn’t come through.

JW:

et’s talk about that trend that impacted all of us, which was rethinking how employees are paid. Outside of on-demand pay, I know that Irene, you mentioned 401(k) and investing. At DailyPay, we did a webinar with Rick Adelman, who talked about looking to save and advance so that you can start investing in the stock market by the end of the pandemic so that this never happens to you again.

JW:

But, Justin, talk about why you think it took a pandemic for many employers, including Kroger and Tractor Supply and other people to think about the importance of providing, a DailyPay solution to their employees? Why did it take the pandemic to get there? Why don’t we just all paying our people that way?

JH:

Well, I think that’s a great point. I was talking to someone the other day about this. The hospitality industry, specifically, the on-demand industry, they staffing on-demand industry really moved to this, I would say a couple of years ago. When we adopted DailyPay 18 months ago, two years ago, we did it out of necessity, because I had to compete with Grubhub, I had to compete with Uber and Lyft and so forth. Especially being in Nashville, we have 800 employees here in Nashville, and we were competing with those on-demand staffing companies.

JH:

I was really forced, and our company, I think our industry was really forced to look at the DailyPay option prior to the pandemic, but I think certainly the pandemic has changed and DailyPay and just the way we look at pay is completely different now, where you’re right, Jeanniey, we have associates taking money out daily or weekly, or whatever it may be for leisure activities and things like that, extra cash for spending. Now, it’s to meet bills, right? They have the requirements they’re trying… Because their savings account’s depleted. The tips aren’t as abundant as they were in pre-pandemic.

JH:

I do think it’s changed a little bit. But our strategy really, our adoption rates have really gone up by I think, roughly 15%, 20%, DailyPay, that is. We were looking at service competitions as incentives to pay, we are looking at different structures within the organization, different initiatives we have, and how we can relate pay to success in those particular initiatives.

JH:

For instance, we have a large service wide competition going on right now. It’s called the PMC Derby, and we have all of our sites from across the nation participating in how many TripAdvisor comments they can get for their respective site, for their respective hotelier, and we have some incentives to go along with that. Again, where there aren’t tips to be had, tips have been somewhat depleted, and they aren’t as political as they once were. So, we’re trying to engage the employee so it benefits the client, they get more of those TripAdvisor positive name mentions, and also the employee, to take care of the employee.

JH:

We’re looking at some outside the box ways to really incentivize and to pay our employees, not only with DailyPay, but this TripAdvisor competition that I mentioned, too.

JW:

I love that. I wish you could all answer every single one of these trends and speak to them, but we would never finish this conversation. So, in the interest of time, I’m going to move to the number two trend that we have seen in 2020, which is really focused around company and leadership diversity. Barbie, I know at the Business of HR, you are always talking about how to hire better, how to be hired better, how to look for a job, how to see what’s out there, and really focus on it.

JW:

During the pandemic, as people were challenged and looking for new roles and other opportunities, we were fortunate, and I am going to use the word fortunate because the world also started to pay attention to company and leadership diversity. People started to pay attention to companies where they may want to become employed and different roles that they might want to take in their own career path to make sure that have that balance out there. So, Barbie, tell us a little bit about what you’re seeing and hearing in the industry around companies and recruiters improving their efforts around DNI, as 2020 progressed?

BW:

It’s a great time, I think in the recruiting space, in the talent space. A lot of messages that many of us in this area have been… I use the word preaching, but shouting for a while, are finally getting, I think attention and recognition in a much more global aspect. Sadly, as a result of events that brought us to this space, and we want to honor the individuals who have been so negatively impacted for such a long time. But the other side of that is sometimes it takes really significant adversity to bring folks attention where it needs to be, and I think that’s where we are now.

BW:

I think organizations have to understand that the cancel culture is real, and it’s also one of the things that I talk and speak to with the folks I’m coaching on the interview side, on the job seeker side is that be very aware that organizations are looking at you and your social media and your imprint that’s out there, your brand, whether you have intentionally designed it or not, everyone is looking at all of these different elements.

BW:

It’s reflective of who you associate yourself with. If you’re an employer, you’re looking at these elements of your potential hires to make sure that there’s nothing that’s going to negatively impact the brand of the company, and likewise the employee should be looking through that same lens of, do my personal values align with the purpose and the values of this organization, and diversity being one of them. We have to look at diversity in more than just the color of our skin, it’s the way we think, the way we problem solve, the way we research, the way we communicate. There’s so many elements to diversity that we need to understand, and that’s what makes it so great is because we can fill in the gaps, right? I’m great at one thing, you’re great at something else. I’m not great at this, you are, awesome. Let’s partner so we can make this happen.

BW:

I think the more we can embrace that level of understanding when it comes to diversity, the better off our organizations are going to be, and the more fulfilled and purposeful our employees are going to feel, because that connection is there, that alignment is organically there, because employees are seeking out companies where they feel aligned and purposeful. I think that organically grows that trust, and that sense of belonging versus fitting in, because I think before now, the focus was are you a fit? Are you a culture fit for us?

BW:

We really have to change that approach from, are you a culture fit to, what are you going to bring to the organization, and are you going to add something, and are you going to enhance us, and how are you going to challenge us to think differently, versus are you going to fit in? It’s incumbent upon the organizations to create a sense of greater belonging versus fitting in. We could talk about that for hours.

JW:

Yeah, and I love that. I know, Irene, at Daily Pay, you did a study that found some really interesting feedback from employees of companies that we work with. Do you want to give some highlights as to-

IH:

Yeah-

JW:

… the diversity insights that you found?

IH:

No, I would love to, and thank you, I think some of the key takeaways are, we’re always thinking about how do we get the best candidates for our organization? 60% of those that we surveyed said that diversity and company leadership is important in deciding where to apply for a job, and they would even take that up to the board level, and say, this is all very transparent now, and people do look to see that diversity, both within the leadership as well as the overall staff.

IH:

Because we serve such a diverse variety of customers and users, we need to have diversity within our organization so that we can understand how we can better support and care for all of those customers. Female leaders, we found 63% of respondents felt that female leaders have a very positive impact on a company’s culture and bottom line, and 59% say having a diverse workforce is overall good for business.

IH:

We really try to implement that, practice what we preach through our employee resource groups, through making sure that we not only have but recently refreshed all of our company values to put diversity, equity and inclusion front and center, to have an enterprise wide Diversity Leadership Council. We’re creating that space that Barbie talked about, for those conversations to happen, not because you should fit in, but because you should belong, and if all the voices aren’t in the conversation, how do we create that belonging?

IH:

I think the other part that’s really important, too, is making sure that we’re talking about career development, career progression, how people can move forward in our promotional tasks within the organization, and it’s wonderful to be part of a healthy, fast growing organization, because there’s so much opportunity.

IH:

Then I think, also having that affinity to social and racial justice, and being a force for good in the world is really, really important to our employees. They tell us that unsolicited and I think that the expectations of a workforce are that you will show up the way that you say you’re going to show up.

JW:

I love it, I think it paints such a great solid picture. So far, we have gone through a number of trends that have emerged during 2020, and we’re down to the number one trend that has emerged during 2020, which is there has been a significant rise in the employer’s role in defining or helping to build the employee safety net. Out of everything that we’ve talked about, from job security to actually making it through from a holistic standpoint, both mentally and financially, I think whether it’s social, whether it’s from a personal safety or financial safety perspective, employees have started to look to the employer as the leader. They’re looking to take their cue, to look for them for advice.

JW:

I would love, in 30 seconds or less from each one of you, because we want to get into what we see the trends are going to be for next year and answer a few questions. What’s your take on this? How well the employers’ new role in ensuring an employee’s complete safety and security really change the way that you act as an HR leader. Moving forward? Justin, I’ll start with you.

JH:

Well, thank you. What a great question. I think looking at the employee as a whole. The employee just doing specific tasks or specific jobs, it’s really looking out for their entire career development, and making sure that the associates see a pathway for the future. PMC is a big growth culture, and if we didn’t have our growth culture, if we weren’t continuously growing, it would be tough for me to navigate, because it’s become part of our culture, who we are.

JH:

The pandemic was devastating because of that, because we lost some of that for probably a month or so while we started to rebuild. But I would say it’s the entire employee approach. The career development, making sure every level of the organization, every class level, has a pathway to get to that next step, and to further their career, and to make a career change in maybe a different part of the business.

JH:

Recently, we’ve had one of our HR professionals transfer over to the business development team, we fostered that transition, I think that was a big move for us, because we paved the way now, for other professionals at the corporate office and out in the field, to do the same thing. We’re about to hire a payroll clerk position here, we’ll hire someone from operations and groom them into that position, and soon, it will be a salaried position. We’re very excited about it. I think it’s looking out, making sure that the employees have a pathway to success, and they have a career development plan, and only their leader can do that.

JW:

That’s fantastic. Irene, do you want to go next?

IH:

Yeah, absolutely. I think I resonate with a lot of the comments, Justin, that you need about career development. We’re always thinking about just how can we meet people where they are and provide them with support. Whether it’s on financial aspects. So, giving stock options in the company, which almost all our employees hold, we rolled out a learning and development stipend this year, so that people could actually have some financial support for their growth and development, and thinking about where that path goes with their manager.

IH:

We are thrilled to also offer unlimited professional development books through Amazon. We really want to cultivate a culture of curiosity, intellectual growth, and maybe exploring. I loved some of the examples you gave, Justin, what do those career paths mean, and how do I think about a whole variety of options? I’m a firm believer that the broader skill set you have, the more value you return. Ultimately, as a professional, the more value that you can return to the organization that you’re a part of. That I think, for us is really the point is making sure that people always feel that we are investing in them.

JW:

Great. Barbie, why don’t you wrap it up with your thoughts on the topic?

BW:

I will. I think there’s two things I would say is that I’ve referenced several times that the global trust survey that Edelman facilitated, and they share with us that I believe it’s 76% of all employees look to their employers as their single source of truth for information. Whether it’s information about them as an employee, but information between them and the world.

BW:

Employers respecting that relationship is incredibly important. When we look at safety net, safety net has so many different facets, and trust is a huge part of creating a safety net. The other side of that, on the financial piece with regard to what DailyPay offers, and Jeanniey, you’ve heard me say this so many times, but I fundamentally believe that when you can provide your employees with a benefit that helps them outside of your relationship with them as an employee, that is how you build trust, loyalty and long term connection.

BW:

By allowing and providing an option for employees to access their wages as needed, that has nothing to do with their job performance. We’re not doing that so that they’ll be more productive. We’re not doing that so that we’re going to get better widgets out of them. We’re doing that because it enriches and enhances their life, their livelihood, their total well being. Which, yes, in turn makes them a better employee. But ultimately, it’s because it’s just the right thing to do for people. I think the more we recognize that it’s those types of connections that really help build that safety net feeling, then more employees will feel better connected to their employers and employers will ultimately have better outcomes.

JW:

Very well said, as always, Barbie. I think, we’ve made it through the top six trends that we’ve seen in 2020. I’m just going to fly through what we’re expecting to see in 2021, based on all of your feedback, and then really jump right into questions, because we’re almost out of time. As we look at what’s coming up in 2021, you can see, there’s a big focus, we expect the trend to be on creating that workplace experience as people return to the office, maybe, maybe not, and there’s even a question about the hotelling concept for people that only want to return one to two days a week, which we’ll talk about.

JW:

The next trend we expect to see being hot topic on the next slide is staffing back up. We didn’t get to talk about it today, but I think the reality that we are seeing at DailyPay is our clients are telling us that they have had to go out and recruit. Even if they had a furlough, or to lay people off, they’re calling those people back and they’re not being as successful. Those people have either found other companies, or they’ve decided to change their career path overall, and staff and companies are having to staff back up from scratch as if they’re hiring. So, how do you do that? How do you attract top talent, especially because I just saw a report that said the percentage of people choosing to leave a job that they have is actually on the rise, and people are still being laid off, companies are still reducing their staff, but people are making choices now through the pandemic to move and focus on their career.

JW:

So, staffing backup will be another key trend that we see. The third one, go to the next slide is going to be the speed of digitization. I think all of you would say that from an HRIS standpoint, whether it was trying to figure out how to get the payroll check writing machine to work faster, or manage call center inquiries or insurance claims in a more digital environment, or even processing onboarding paperwork, and tax requirements, and documents have really caused us all to look at digitization, and I don’t think the world is going to slow down.

JW:

Digitizing pay, and making it available through an app like DailyPay is just one of the innovations that we’ll see hot and heavy as we move forward. The next one is working smarter. You all spoke about this and the need for work life balance, and the need for enrichment, in addition to the question I asked Barbie, on do you think people are ever going to return 100% to the office as a mandatory requirement, being a thing of the past.

JW:

I think work-life unbalance has become work-life blend, and I think we’re going to see people working smarter as a result of just cost efficiencies that their companies are challenging them with, as well as just balancing remote working with the lifestyle needs of children in schools, or elderly people, even as the vaccine gets approved and come out.

JW:

As we go on to the next slide, I think we are ready to open it up for transparency into pay. We did talk about this and I did promise that, that would be the last thing that we talked about. But I think between Justin’s comments and Barbie’s comments, everybody has gotten the message, it really hit home that giving choice and control to your employees, it’s free, it helps you to work more cost efficiently, it enables your employees to decide how they manage through this pandemic, and through all the challenges of returning back to a successful economy is probably one of the easiest and most effective things that you can do.

JW:

With that said, in the four minutes that we have left, there have been a number of questions that have been submitted. I’m going to pick out one or two here that we can answer very quickly and wrap up. The first question I will ask is… Let’s see, some of the things you’ve mentioned need change management. For all three of you, I think this was a perfect question to end on, and to wrap up, what’s your advice on starting the conversation with executives around change management to ensure a productive workplace and productive employees as we move forward? Barbie, I’ll start with you.

BW:

Oh, goodness, okay. I have somewhat of a unique view on change management. In that, I believe there are two elements to transformation, because that’s really what we’re talking about is transformation of some sort. There’s the change management which typically follows the Kotter’s eight steps, right? Which is a very tried and true model for change management, which is the outside in, those are the new elements we’re introducing; a new system, a new tool, a new process. Then there’s changed leadership, and that’s what happens from the inside out, and that’s often the most neglected element of transformation is the inside out, and that’s addressing behaviors, existing processes, existing thought process, as well as actions.

BW:

If we’re going to go to our leaders to talk about the changes we need to make, we need to look at both sides of transformation. What is it going to take to change the internal behaviors? We need to look at our people, our behaviors, our processes, our current expectations, and then what is it that we’re trying to achieve, and what is the change management side of it, what is the tool or the expectation, and how do we bring those together to get to the transformation we really want?

BW:

Making sure you’re speaking the language that resonates with your leaders is likely the first step. What do they care about? They care about business outcomes. So, how can the changes that you’re recommending improve business outcomes? Typically, if you’re looking at flexibility in the workplace, or what have you, it’s about making sure your employees feel those connections, feel valued, heard and understood. In order to do that, here’s what we recommend, here’s the tools, the systems and the processes, and here’s what we expect to be the outcome. Speak the language your business leaders understand if you want them to pay attention to your request.

JW:

Great, Justin, how would you add to that?

JH:

Well, I think, we talked a little bit earlier about serving your folks and finding out the lifeblood of your organization, and really what makes people tick. I’m a big proponent of data and bringing data and business case to the executive team. Every time I bring more data to build my case, the closer I get to change management, right?

JH:

It’s all about what the people want, right? Of course, we’re a people company, we’re a staffing company, our people, they’re our product. So, I always go back to that, I always go back to statistics around our people, what they’re saying, what they’re telling us, and make sure that of course, that aligns with your core values. But I think certainly the more in depth your business case, and the better data you have to support your change, the faster you’ll be able to do that and more efficient you’ll be able to do that.

JH:

Then I would tell you too, that it’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon. Change management doesn’t happen overnight. It happens over the course of weeks, you have to grind out. I’ve been in this role now for over three years, there’s nothing that’s come easy. Even the DailyPay integration that we did two years ago, one of the best things I’ve ever done in my career is to address this major problem of not being able to pay people as quick as I wanted to. But that took forever, that initiative took me a while to get over the finish line. I would say it’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon, bring data to the table, present your case, and know that you got to keep grinding at it.

JW:

I love it. All right, Irene, wrap it up and bring it home with the last bit of advice.

IH:

Thank you. I think the point about seeing the end point and creating the data to support that journey is incredibly important, and my wrapper around all of that is the pace of change is accelerating, employee expectations are accelerating rapidly as well, and we are in a very rare period of dislocation where I think incremental change is… People are becoming impatient with it, and they’re looking for really simple transformational leadership. I think it’s important for us to name that. We hear it from our employees, and I think we need to demand it from ourselves.

JW:

Brilliant, and thank you all again, so much for sharing your expertise and your thoughts on what developed in 2020, and what we’re going to see in 2021. Thank you for all of the participants. I know we’re one minute over. If you are still interested in hearing what else we have to bring to you from DailyPay, please join us at our upcoming webinar presented by the Hackett Group on How to Leverage Process Mapping to Choose and On- Demand Pay Vendor.

JW:

Thanks again for all of your great insights. Hopefully you have a very successful end of 2020 and an even more successful 2021. Justin, Irene and Barbie, amazing content as always. Appreciate it. Thanks, everybody.

IH:

Thank you.

BW:

Thanks, everyone.

JH:

Thank you. Have a good day.

BW:

Great webinar.

Who’s DailyPay

DailyPay, the premier provider of the daily pay benefit, goes beyond financial wellness with a flexible, simple, and compliant pay experience that strengthens the employee-employer bond and significantly enhances the employee experience throughout the enterprise.

CONTACT US